Langford ruins at Big Bend National Park

Going all the way back to 1909, the Langford family has had an influence over a small corner of the Big Bend region.  Suffering from malaria, JO Langford heard rumors of a hot spring that had therapeutic capability.   Langford built a boathouse over the hot spring soon thereafter and later added a general store/post office and a few little bungalows for guests to stay in as they sampled the healing power of the hot springs for a whopping 10 cents a day.

Over 100 years later, the hot spring at Big Bend is one of the most popular destinations – it’s relatively easy to get to, the water is absolutely fantastic and you just flat out can’t beat the setting.

The most common image you’ll see of what’s left of Langford’s enterprise is of the general store/post office.

Langford's Store

Yeah, the tree is definitely not a native Big Bend species, but you can see the tree in this image dating back to the 1930s, as it appears here on the Big Bend NP site.

Langford's store, 1930s

Not being content to just shoot what everyone else does, I hunted around for some different views of the remnants of Langford’s homestead.

squares and angles

wall art

Langford’s store was another place that I haven’t been to in Big Bend in over 20 years.  I can tell you that it won’t be another 20!

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~ by Derrick Birdsall on November 29, 2010.

7 Responses to “Langford ruins at Big Bend National Park”

  1. I like your alternative shots. I have never been to the Langford ruins nor to the hot spring. Isn’t that a shame?

  2. Nice work. I especially like the last one, wall art. The framing is superb.

    • PJ – thanks!!! I think these types of images are nice to get positive feedback on as I actually *meant* to do that and it wasn’t just because I was somewhere that looked nice and had a camera.

  3. Great post, Derrick and, like PJ, I think the last shot is beautiful!
    Sharon

    • Thanks to you too, Sharon – I really liked how the lines in the hill across the way contrasted with the straight lines of the window frame… that’s what caught my eye at first. And I must apologize that it took me so long to do but you are now a welcomed addition to my blogroll. 🙂

  4. Thank you, Derrick. I will do the same. 🙂

    Sharon

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